Wicked Women Wednesday #2

In celebration of the month long voting period for the Wicked Women Writers Challenge (go to http://www.horroraddicts.net to listen to the stories…then, vote for your favorite by emailing horroraddicts@gmail.com  …  end shameless plug), I’ve conducted a series of interviews with the other participants.  Since there are 4 weeks to vote and there are 13 women taking part in the contest, more than one author will be featured each Wednesday until the first week of October.

This week finds Chantal Noordeloos, Rebekah Webb, and Marie Robinson sharing the hot seat.  Keep reading to find out tidbits about these interesting women.  How did they get here?  What do they have in common?  Whose familiar would win in a grudge match?

———-

Chantal Noordeloos

chantinWhat brought you to the Wicked Women Writers Challenge?

I think it was Paula D. Ashe who posted a link on her Facebook wall. My first reaction was “Wicked Women… now that sounds promising.” When I saw it was a podcast, I was sold. To be honest, I didn’t realize it was a competition until later (because I only read a little bit at first and decided I wanted to enter) I’m not too bothered about the whole competition part of it, I just wanted the challenge.

What did you find most challenging in the recording of your story?

Writing my story under 10 minutes of airtime. It was pretty damn hard, because I wasn’t in complete control over the plot. There were elements I had to put in there that I would not normally put together in one plot. And I only had so much space to do it in.

How do you create your villains?

That depends on what story. In this case it was easy, my disaster was a storm… why not make ‘it’ the villain. I’m a big fan of villains, so I do tend to spend a lot of time fantasizing about how I want to create them. I tend to go with “what would scare me / make me angry” and work from there.

What’s your worst experience with killing a character?

I don’t think I have a ‘worst’ experience. I guess I once got an annoyed reader because they thought one of the characters that I killed was set up to be the main character of the story. But it wasn’t too bad.

What are your thoughts on happy endings in horror stories?

Some horror stories need a happy ending. Some don’t. It’s all about what makes it the best story, and gets your readers involved.

If you could have any animal as a pet or familiar, what would you choose?

I’d have a fairy dragon.

Like her on Facebook.  Follow her on Twitter.  Visit her Website.

———-

Rebekah Webb

rebekahWhat brought you to the Wicked Women Writers Challenge?

I entered in 2011 and wanted to have another go, since it was so much fun the first time around.

What did you find most challenging in the recording of your story?

I had to clean up the recording for any misspoken words, interruptions and the pauses that came when I stopped the recording and started up again. Deleting things wasn’t so bad, but recording over misspoken words was a bit of a challenge, since I had to record the word again and paste it into the correct place and make sure the intonation sounded consistent with the original sentence.

How do you create your villains?

I create them the same way I create any other character. I just give them a more villainous point of view, but give most of them a real mind and motivation, since not all people who do monstrous actions are sociopaths. The scariest villain is the one any of us can become. I also create good old fashioned sociopaths as well.

Sometimes I end up despising some of the characters, but that’s a good thing when writing a character that’s supposed to be unlikeable.

What’s your worst experience with killing a character?

I created a character for a novel/short story collection I have out on submission, Midnight comes Softly. Lots of people die in the novel, but this one I felt bad about killing, simply because I slipped into a reader mindset when writing him. He dies at his brother’s hand, and the brother is forced to go through his death over and over and the guilt associated with it (they’re both demons and that’s how demons punish killing kin – the demons in my fictional universe are modified sociopaths who only feel emotion for close family members. It’s not as complicated as it sounds.)

I wanted to give them both happy endings, but realized it would ruin the consistency of the characters, story or overall tone of the book.

What are your thoughts on happy endings in horror stories?

I don’t think it’s either or. Sometimes a happy ending is needed and sometimes a sad ending is needed and sometimes an ending with both is needed, even in horror. I’ve noticed some people tend to either think that it’s only realistic to portray the more negative aspects of life, or think the opposite and think that portraying anything negative is the same as causing it to happen. The world’s filled with both, and all of life’s experiences are worthy of depiction, even the painful ones we wish we could ignore.

Horror’s about exploring the darker aspects of life, but that doesn’t mean it gets a free pass on the realism associated with that darkness. It’s more frightening if the core structure is real, showing a world that’s consistent with the one we live in, where things sometimes work out, sometimes don’t and are sometimes a mix. With that touch of reality, even the most fictional monster will still unnerve you.

If you could have any animal as a pet or familiar, what would you choose?

Hmm, either a cat, dog or a flying zombie dolphin. A cat would slink along and be easy to carry, a dog would follow me with innocent enthusiasm and a flying zombie dolphin would let me ride it through a drive-thru and frighten the unprepared cashiers.

Like her on Facebook.  Follow her on Twitter.  Visit her Website.

———-

Marie Robinson

marieWhat brought you to the Wicked Women Writers Challenge?

I heard about the Wicked Women Writers challenge from one of my favorite horror market websites, Dark Markets.

What did you find most challenging in the recording of your story?

Fitting everything I wanted to in the allowed time (10 minutes of recording) was the most difficult. I didn’t want it to seem rushed. I did end up cutting some stuff but nothing remarkable.

What did you find most challenging in doing the recording of your story?

My villains are almost never human—usually supernatural or otherwise. And so it was for “Motherhood”. I didn’t want to do a natural bug, I wanted to be original and create my own little monsters.

What’s your worst experience with killing a character?

In a story I have finished that hasn’t found a place in the market yet, there’s a child that is killed. I felt pretty uncomfortable about it, but that ended up being the very reason I went through with it.

What are your thoughts on happy endings in horror stories?

You know, usually I don’t like them!! I don’t know what came over me to put a happy ending on this one. I mean—in the grand scheme of things there isn’t one because it is, after all, an apocalyptic story.

If you could have any animal as a pet or familiar, what would you choose?

Love this question! I really wish I could have one, if I could have anything I’d say perhaps a big crow. But my dog is pretty close to the real thing, and I also have a black cat so I’m pretty set!

Like her blog on Facebook.  Visit her Website.

———-

Thank you, ladies.  It’s been a pleasure.  In case you thought I had nothing to say, here’s a link to Chantal Boudreau’s interview with me.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s